Chi Chi Cham Combines Chinese & Japanese Fare For an Innovative Izakaya Experience

The trend of ‘fusion’ cuisine seems to crop up a lot in new restaurant openings, yet the concept isn’t limited to East-meets-West varieties (as we’ve seen plenty in recent years). Capturing the essence of two cultures in one dish is a challenge in itself—only the most well-heeled, experienced chefs are able to do so. Chi Chi Cham sways away from Western counterparts and focuses on what Hong Kong—arguably—seems to love best, Japanese and Chinese food. Combining the two, the restaurant serves up a menu of izakaya dishes in its ‘Emperor Menu’ with innovative curations in its sashimi, donburi and yakitori dishes. We stopped by the late-night hotspot on a trip to Soho’s Peel Street to taste a selection of the best dishes on the menu. Here’s what he thought…

Image courtesy of Aiden Bradley | Cha Siu Papers Times

Location, Atmosphere and Decor


This Chinese-Japanese fusion restaurant is located on one of the most bustling streets in Central. Peel Street has recently become the go-to destination for many bar-hoppers and food junkies alike. Chi Chi Cham hits the nail on the head with both of these audiences as they offer some fantastic happy hours along with an excellent variety of food. Guests who find themselves in the restaurant are greeted with a light and friendly atmosphere.

chi chi cham

Image courtesy of Aiden Bradley | Cha Siu Papers Times

The interior is filled with traditional Chinese influences such as the “Longpao” costumes scattered along the walls of the room. The word translates to “Dragon Gown” in English and was the traditional attire of many Chinese emperors. These outfits are also available for the guests to wear, making the experience all the more fun.

One of our favorite things about the bar was that portions were generous. The menu is well priced and the options are plentiful for those looking for a new cocktail (or two) to try.

Image courtesy of Aiden Bradley | Cha Siu Papers Times

We tried the Yuzu spritzer and can confidently say that we had our moneys’ worth. The acidity of the Yuzu was well balanced with the syrup—add a dash of mint leaves and you’ve got a well-balanced cocktail to delight the senses.

Image courtesy of Aiden Bradley | Cha Siu Papers Times

Unique dishes


The menu at Chi Chi Cham comes on a traditional Chinese-style scroll, designed to be rolled out across the table. Items included classical dishes from Chinese and Japanese backgrounds as well as fusions of the two types of food.

Image courtesy of Aiden Bradley | Cha Siu Papers Times

First, we tried the Toro Tartare and Uni rice cup, served in a beautiful and elegant china cup. The appetiser came served with hot rice making the base of the dish and a sprinkle of truffle to finish it off.

Image courtesy of Aiden Bradley | Cha Siu Papers Times

The signature dish of the restaurant is the “Chi Chi Fries”. The crinkle cut fries came nestled in a wooden basket. The dish was sprinkled with ketchup, seaweed, Japanese mayonnaise and sesame seeds. While the combination of ingredients sounded odd, the garnishing worked harmoniously with the fries and turned what we considered to be a regular side dish to a main of its own.

Image courtesy of Aiden Bradley | Cha Siu Papers Times

We then tried the Smoked Duck Breast roll, a large duck breast wrapped in a deep-fried wrap with a pancake-like consistency. The dish reminded us of Japanese-style tempura. However, we found the combination of the rich duck and heavy pancake wrap to be overpowering and filling to the bite.

Image courtesy of Aiden Bradley | Cha Siu Papers Times

Next, we tried an assortment of sashimi. Sushi advocates unite to taste the refreshing, delicate slices of fresh-cut fish for a light appetiser between meals—or, if you’re a real fanatic, it becomes the star of the show. The Small Platter comprised three pieces of salmon, yellowtail fish and fatty swordfish.