The Refinery Club is a Contemporary Members’ Club For Discerning Professionals

Private members’ clubs in Hong Kong are nothing new—decades of colonial openings including the most coveted country clubs, jockey clubs and yacht clubs have led the city to house a range of prestigious members-only venues. Aiming to connect like-minded individuals, private members’ clubs are a great way to network and socialise—with perk facilities like expansive swimming pools and exclusive restaurants reigning in guests from allover.


More recently, the city has been seeing more modern clubs crop up, including the highly-anticipated creative hub Soho House. Another recent, under-the-radar venture, The Refinery by Swire Properties is a contemporary gem nestled within Taikoo Place. We visited the private club’s restaurant, the Main Dining Room, where Michelin-starred Chef Jacky Chan cooked up a meticulous six-course menu, comprising signatures including his award-winning “The Eastern Pearl” soup.

Image courtesy of Mr Ping | Cha Siu Papers Times

A contemporary haven


Situated in the heart of Taikoo Place, amid Swire’s surrounding venues, The Refinery is a private members’ club designed for working professionals to host meetings, social events and to unwind with guests.

Image courtesy of Mr Ping | Cha Siu Papers Times

Managed by the world-renowned Peninsula Group, the establishment stays true to its minimalistic design and five-star hospitality, with a modern update. Decked in an art-deco-inspired theme, The Refinery Club is tastefully decorated with chic interiors and a muted colour palette to keep things clean and simple.

Image courtesy of Mr Ping | Cha Siu Papers Times

Facilities


The Club is strategically located amidst the office blocks at Taikoo Place. It’s a little tricky to find the venue—but follow the instructions or signposts throughout the building and it takes you to a private lift entrance. As a regular gym-goer at PURE, I was already familiar with the club’s convenient location and was ready to see it live having walked past many times before. Stepping out of the private lift, we walked out to be immediately greeted by the reception and its friendly staff.

Image courtesy of Mr Ping | Cha Siu Papers Times

Here, members check-in or can request a viewing with a pre-scheduled appointment. On the right, the sleek gym offers utmost privacy compared to regular gyms, with its own sauna for post-workout relaxation. Like its mother brand Peninsula Hotels, the gym reflected the same high-standard (and stringent hygiene), immaculate setting found at its own in-hotel fitness areas. Although the space is quite small, it’s well-equipped enough with machines and weights to get a good workout in—perhaps on a lunch break or after work. Further facilities include the bar, lounge and terrace.

Image courtesy of Mr Ping | Cha Siu Papers Times

Main Dining Room


We walked through the club towards the restaurant—The Club’s Main Dining Room—which specialises in authentic Cantonese cuisine with a contemporary twist. The open-air venue welcomes business and leisure members to sit back and indulge in the fine cuisine prepared by Executive Chef Jacky Chan—a Michelin-starred, Peninsula-trained mastermind behind the menu. Guests seeking more privacy can dine at one of the three semi-private dining rooms or the private dining room for total seclusion. On the walls, artworks by American artist Nicholas Johnson light up the room with a splash of colour.

Image courtesy of Mr Ping | Cha Siu Papers Times

After several culinary stints with different branches of the Peninsula Hotels and at Cuisine Cuisine in the Mira Hotel (where he earned two Michelin stars during his time there), Chan has led quite a career in Cantonese cuisine. At the restaurant’s peak era, Chan’s father fell ill and he was left to make a life-changing decision which led him to temporarily leave his culinary path and pursue a new journey which allowed him to spend more time with his father—a choice which he stands by to this day.

Image courtesy of Mr Ping | Cha Siu Papers Times

Moving to The Refinery, Chan curated an innovative Cantonese menu, incorporating subtle international influences to coincide with the overseas members’ acquired tastes. We spoke to the chef during our dinner experience and (through translation between Cantonese and English), we learned that he finds a lot of his influence through his previous experiences and through modern-day culinary trends which gives him room to experiment. A very humble and modest man, Chan gave off a warm, authentic character and it was a joy to speak to him although briefly.