Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong, a Glamourous, Elusive Breed of Luxury Steeped in History

HONG KONG


Mandarin Oriental's flagship sits in Central, Hong Kong, where it all began in 1963. The luxury hotel group has since expanded globally but its roots remain firmly in the bustling city, with an aura that exudes a coddling, oriental signature touch difficult to find elsewhere. It's the kind of place where all guests are welcomed by name, service is swift and celebrities – with a list of that has included Margaret Thatcher and Henry Kissinger – are regulars. Not a single element is overlooked, and it's easy to see why the flagship was only the beginning of generations of luxury hospitality to come. We visited the decades-long favourite to see and understand why the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Hong Kong is the legend that it is.

Image courtesy of Adam Thompson | CSP Times

Check-in was simple and efficient, with our receptionist guiding us to the hotel room after a brief introduction to our stay and locations for necessities – which would be, naturally, the Club Lounge, restaurants and swimming pool. The lobby area is lavish and spacious, with a dedicated lounge area decked in plush, sumptuous decor for those looking to wait in style – and comfort.


Image courtesy of Adam Thompson | CSP Times
Image courtesy of Adam Thompson | CSP Times
Image courtesy of Adam Thompson | CSP Times

One step up from the Harbour View Room, we stayed in the aforementioned accommodation with an added Club access bonus – the Club Harbour View Room. Spacious with panoramic views of the Victoria Harbour, the room was kitted in the signature oriental-chic interiors with vintage Chinese artworks hung upon the walls. It's the little touches that make up the stay at Mandarin Oriental – for example, a pair of in-room binoculars reminiscent of a bygone era, or for old-schoolers, a norm. We were also welcomed with a hot tea set accompanied with an array of Chinese snacks – best devoured in bed, of course, or while peering over the brilliant harbour-city scene from the window.


Dining at Man Wah


Image courtesy of Faye Bradley | CSP Times

Unveiling its new look this year, the beloved Cantonese Man Wah reopened its doors with a fresh new look, adorned with pops of lapis lazuli and a more contemporary spin from its previous design. The restaurant retains its refined elegance with beautiful Chinese artworks and a new era of lanterns hanging from the ceiling for a nod to a modern understated look.


Unsurprisingly, Mah Wah is always full, with discerning guests making time for lunch meetings or couples booking in for elaborate date nights. Everyone feels and looks well-heeled, judging from the black-tie attire. It's the place to be and be seen – as it has been for the past 53 years and counting. The menu by Executive Chinese Chef Wing-Keung continues to excel with a few new modern variations to appeal to dignified crowds. We tried a few of the new dishes and was truly blown away by the incredible culinary expertise, attentive staff and stunning design that combined together, was a clear reminder of why Man Wah has held its Michelin star for so long.



Image courtesy of Faye Bradley | CSP Times

Pictured: Deep-fried matsutake mushroom pudding, marinated abalone, Shanghainese-style at Man Wah


The mushroom is cooked to a certain temperature to obtain the perfect level of softness and is recommended to eat half with sugar and the other half without sugar. Juicy and silky-smooth, this dish resembled a soup-like texture on the inside.


Image courtesy of Faye Bradley | CSP Times

Pictured: Marinated abalone, Shanghainese-style


Beautifully presented, the marinated abalone was cooked in abalone sauce with other seafood and is a dish borrowed from Shanghai.


Image courtesy of Faye Bradley | CSP Times

Pictured: Pan-fried Hokkaido scallop, bread crumb


Using a jumbo scallop from Hokkaido, this dish was served with a fermented scallop dollop on the side and tofu crumbs. It's recommended to try the first half with the fermented scallops then the second half with the tofu.


Image courtesy of Faye Bradley | CSP Times

Pictured: Sautéed lobster, superior fish broth


A personal favourite and possibly the best lobster dish we've tried to date, the Man Wah dish uses concentrated broth with garoupa – explicitly mentioned without corn starch – and is served with salmon roe before it's sprinkled by hand with dehydrated black caviar from France.


Image courtesy of Faye Bradley | CSP Times

Pictured: Pork belly with taro and taro crisps


To finish, the pork belly with taro reminded us a little bit of zhongzi, the Chinese glutinous rice dish often served during Dragonboat festival. Instead of using rice, however, it's served with less bloating taro for a unique take on the classic. The taro crisps were also an interesting touch and we dipped it in the succulent sauce from the meat. We also sipped on our sparkling signature blend of Chinese Rosella, earl grey and strawberry green tea, which was the perfect time to help digestion.